Ho, Ho, Ho and Ha, Ha, Ha | East Villager & Lower East Sider

Ho, Ho, Ho and Ha, Ha, Ha

“A Murray Little Christmas” has the middle-aged showbiz schmoozer hosting a highball-friendly evening of bawdy entertainment. Dec. 13. Photo by Orlanda Marra

“A Murray Little Christmas” has the middle-aged showbiz schmoozer hosting a highball-friendly evening of bawdy entertainment. Dec. 13.
Photo by Orlanda Marra

A MURRAY LITTLE CHRISTMAS  |  It’s not quite the same as being eternally young, but classy impresario Murray Hill has been living up to his “hardest working middle-aged man in show business” moniker for two decades now, even going back before the iconic drag king’s 1996 mayoral bid. What a different town this would be had he won! Fortunately, there’s no need to indulge in “It’s a Wonderful Life”-type speculation. For one show only, the naughty times are back — and even Santa must think that’s nice, considering the fact that he’s been booked for the gig.

Full of more burlesque royalty than you can shake a tassel at, “A Murray Little Christmas” finds the affable Mr. Hill hosting a recreation of his infamous bachelor pad holiday cocktail parties — where the only thing blue about Christmas is the humor. So kick back, down a highball and enjoy Murray’s road tested roster of seasonal skits, cheesy songs and the kind of dazzling production numbers that come from another era (back when people actually rehearsed for these things!). Guests include burlesque sensations Trixie Little, Perle Noire and Mr. Gorgeous, carnal chanteuse Bridget Everett and Carmine Covelli (a.k.a Sebastian The Elf) — plus swinging backup from The Craig’s List Quartet. Rudolph and the aforementioned Mr. Claus will appear, but they’ll have a hard time upstaging Murray’s traditional (and potentially traumatizing) appearance as The Little Drummer Boy. This non-returnable gift of unfettered jubilation is not for young eyes or prudish ears. As Murray says, “All denominations, orientations and sexual proclivities will be celebrated!”

Sat., Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. At (Le) Poisson Rouge (158 Bleecker St. btw. Sullivan & Thompson Sts.). Tickets: $20 standing, $25 seated. Reserved front VIP seating, $55. Reservations at lespoissonrouge.com. Info: 212-505-3474. Visit Murray at mistershowbiz.com. Twitter & Instagram: @Murray_Hill.

A touch of Mink: Baltimore’s Stole brings her own brand of holiday spirit to NYC, Dec. 11–14. Courtesy of the artist

A touch of Mink: Baltimore’s Stole brings her own brand of holiday spirit to NYC, Dec. 11–14.
Courtesy of the artist

MINK STOLE: OMG! IT’S CHRISTMAS!
Few in this town can honestly claim to have been good all year long — so it’s best not to question why Santa has gifted us with shows starring Mink Stole two years in a row. After turning in a wonderfully vulnerable and understated performance in the New Ohio Theatre’s 2013 revival of Tennessee Williams’ “The Mutilated,” the Baltimore native and John Waters muse is returning to NYC, this time with a show of her own creation. Filled with celebratory music and revelatory anecdotes from Christmases long, long ago, “OMG!” promises to expose fans to hidden dimensions of the underground legend’s range (vocal and otherwise).

Accompanied by a trio of longtime collaborators dubbed Her Wonderful Band, songs include “Stay a Little Longer Santa,” a French version of “The Little Drummer Boy” and a sing-along to “The Twelve Days of Christmas.” Next year, look for her back on the screen, in “Hush Up, Sweet Charlotte.” Directed by Billy Clift, it’s a drag parody of the Bette Davis thriller from 1964 — two years before Stole would begin her own stellar career of cinematic atrocities, with an appearance in John Waters’ “Roman Candles.”

Thurs.–Sun., Dec. 11–14 at 8:30 p.m. At The Laurie Beechman Theatre (407 W. 42nd St., at Ninth Ave). Tickets: $25 plus a $15 food/drink minimum ($50 VIP ticket gets you preferred seating and backstage meet and greet). Reservations: 212-352-3101 or SpinCycleNYC.com. Visit minkstole.com.

He may not be the Messiah, but Eric Idle excels at adapting very naughty Monty Python films for the stage. His “Life of Brian”-based oratorio plays Carnegie Hall on Dec. 15 & 16. Courtesy of the artist

He may not be the Messiah, but Eric Idle excels at adapting very naughty Monty Python films for the stage. His “Life of Brian”-based oratorio plays Carnegie Hall on Dec. 15 & 16.
Courtesy of the artist

NOT THE MESSIAH (He’s a Very Naughty Boy)
He co-founded Monty Python, he created “The Rutles” and he blogged as recently as last week — but all of this creative output was just mere practice, practice, practice for Eric Idle’s Dec. 15 & 16 gigs at Carnegie Hall. There, the man who wrote the book and lyrics for the long-running Broadway hit “Spamalot” will shepherd another Monty Python film to the stage — with assistance from Victoria Clark, Marc Kudisch, Lauren Worsham, William Ferguson, conductor/director Ted Sperling, the Collegiate Chorale and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s.

Created in 2007 with longtime musical collaborator John Du Prez, this comic oratorio is based on the 1979 film, “Life of Brian” — Monty Python’s exceedingly sharp satire of mistaken identity and deification. “Not The Messiah (He’s a Very Naughty Boy)” incorporates elements of pop, country, Broadway, doo-wop, hip-hop, and Greek chorus. It also includes an audience participation version of “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life.” Sung during the crucifixion scene toward the end of “Life of Brian,” the Idle-penned tune was recently cited as Britain’s most popular funeral hymn.

Mon. & Tues., Dec. 15 & 16 at 8 p.m. At Carnegie Hall (Seventh Ave. at 57th St.). For tickets ($30), call 212-247-7800 or visit carnegiehall.org. For more info on the artists: EricIdle.com, collegiatechorale.org and OSLmusic.org.

—By Scott Stiffler